We Can Do Better…

Wecandobetter

EVERY HUMAN BEING DESERVES DIGNITY AND RESPECT, WITHOUT EXCEPTION.
There is much disturbance in response to a video circulating depicting the SF police handling of Black man with a prosthetic leg. He was behaving in ways that caused potential threat to harming himself and others. To many, the video depicts careless and humiliating treatment of a disabled individual. The images of 14 or more police officers attending to the event fearful of a hostile crowd, brings up images from our country’s racialized history and current events. From the police perspective they followed legal and correct protocol, and while they may believe they acted with much restraint, WE CANNOT ACCEPT THIS APPROACH AS NORMAL POLICE BEHAVIOR as we go forward. We want more for our city.

Read more ›

Tagged with: , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized

Celebrating Chinaka Hodge

By Dori Caminong (Manager, Special Events, Civic and Social Innovation)

Chinaka-Hodge_color1The GLIDE Legacy Gala is one day away! This special evening celebrates the beloved community of social influencers committed to making an impact in San Francisco. We will dance, eat, drink, rejoice and commemorate the visionary leadership of Rev. Cecil Williams and Janice Mirikitani who have tirelessly led the charge creating and cultivating  unconditional love and acceptance throughout San Francisco for over five decades.

GLIDE’s Community Hero Awards Ceremony at the 6th Annual GLIDE Legacy Gala honors individuals who have made an impact on communities with their unique talents, innovative leadership, and passion. This year, the Legacy Award will be given to Chinaka Hodge. Janice Mirikitani shared, “Chinaka is a young leader of tremendous talent, insight and creativity, and she brings to light —  through her spoken word brilliance  — courageous conviction, truth and inspiration.” Cecil Williams added,”She is a beloved member of our GLIDE family providing her powerful voice to our message as she continues to help us affirm that BLACK LIVES MATTER, ALL LIVES MATTER.”

Chinaka Hodge writes, sings, studies, directs plays and teaches about Oakland. While she has received national recognition, her artistic work has always focused on her hometown- more recently on the gentrification she sees happening in Oakland, while native Oaklanders continue to live in poverty.  Chinaka’s artistic work embodies the foundation GLIDE is built upon – pushing people to think, to take action, to gain compassion, and to love beyond their comfort zones. When not educating or writing, Hodge rocks mics as a founding member of a collaborative hip-hop ensemble, The Getback. Her poems, editorials, interviews, and prose have been featured in Newsweek, San Francisco Magazine, The Believer, PBS, NPR, CNN, C-Span, and in two seasons of HBO’s Def Poetry.

Chinaka shares her GLIDE story as she answers our #topfour burning questions.

Gprib14-045How did you first hear about GLIDE? What is your “coming to GLIDE” story? How would you describe your relationship to GLIDE and how has it changed over the years?

I don’t think you can grow up in The Bay Area and not know about the work GLIDE does. I can’t recall the first time hearing about the work, or knowing members of the GLIDE community as active, engaged, concerned and fierce citizens. There WAS a project where Youth Speaks poets interacted with GLIDE and put on a performance that tied poetry to spirit. A few of my favorite writers (Brandon Santiago, Dennis Kim and Benjamin E. Turner) performed at GLIDE and I came to see them, there. I was overwhelmed by the true diversity, not just of phenotype, but of personality and experience. The love for all, regardless of walk, permeated throughout.

G HFest14-565What inspired you to become a storyteller?

I also can’t remember how I became a storyteller. I have very fond memories from my pre-school days of walking to the public library with my teacher Mama Jasiri, and listening to the stories told by the librarians there. My mother, father and stepfather are all blessed with the gift of oration. My mother is precise and witty. My father loves an allegory and revels in an anecdote. My stepdad tells stories that are deep and probing. And ALL of them love a great joke. Aside from their humor and knack for narrative, they all watched the great comedians — Pryor, Carlin, Williams — on a regular basis. I’ve always been a theater geek. I loved Shakespeare at an early age. I loved the West African folklore with which I was reared, particularly the legend of Sundiata. I was a little ham in those days and always wanted to be the lead in the school play (though I was consistently cast as the teacher or grandma. I was also an old-at-heart little fart. Ha!). I think my favorite storytellers blend the best of these skills. Storytellers that are my contemporaries like Ryan Coogler, Donald Glover, Jennifer Johns and Ryan Nicole Austin inspire me now. I hope to tell stories that inspire, excite, surprise, engage and instruct, like they do.

G HFest14-219Who is someone you met at GLIDE whom you will not easily forget and why?

Does Janice count if I met her outside the walls of GLIDE? She carries GLIDE with her wherever she goes, so I think she’s fair game. I met Janice at a poetry reading in North Beach when I was 14. I think Genny Lim was on that bill, too. I got to hear these two powerful women speak with authority, humor, wit, insight and a rare historicity that I could not help but be moved. Later in life I met Jonah Matranga, who is part of the chorus. We met artistically, also outside the walls of GLIDE, but I think he embodies the best of the institution as well. He leads with kindness, grace, poise and radical inclusion. I also know Lauren Baranco and her family from the wayyy back. Lauren? Well, Lauren is that dude. She’s fiercely intelligent and has always leant her intelligence (which is also read as power) to the betterment of the communities in which she participates. I think her love for humanity radiates from her center outwards, and is probably what makes her as gorgeous as she is.


G Buffett12-440Our core values emerge from GLIDE as a spiritual movement. They are rooted in empowerment, recovery and personal transformation. Our values inspire and guide our behaviors, they are the ground we stand on.  Below, please find our core values, is there one particular core value which strongly resonates with you personally and why?

I’d say of all of GLIDE’s core values, I’m most drawn to truth-telling. It is what I aim to do in my writing and performance. It is a dangerous act, even on the good days. It requires patience, focus, humility and honor. It is damned hard, every day. I think both Janice and Cecil have hunkered down into the persistent activation of truth telling, it is what, in my opinion has fueled the rest of GLIDE’s mission. It’s how GLIDE feeds, clothes, shelters, and inspires its constituents. I hope to be as brave in my truth-telling as I see members of the GLIDE family are.

One day countdown until the 6th Annual GLIDE Legacy Gala! Tickets are available at http://glide.org/legacygalatickets.  See you on Saturday!

S11836898_10153458785497856_3461542956952389636_nince 2005, Dori has been a young leader at GLIDE, one of San Francisco’s premier human services agencies for the poor and most vulnerable communities. She currently serves as Manager – Special Events, Civic and Social Innovation and also known as GLIDE’s Chief Fun Officer (self-appointed). With a strong commitment to diversity and radical inclusion, she is passionate about the intersections of community, technology and culture working closely with various stakeholders to curate meaningful conversations and engagement opportunities to create bridges of hope and collaboration within the Bay Area’s digital eco-system. She was recently appointed to the neighborhood seat of the San Francisco Entertainment Commission by the Board of Supervisors and took office on March 3, 2015. A native San Franciscan, she resides in the Excelsior District. She has been called ubiquitous for her passionate support of San Francisco’s music, arts, culture, community and nightlife scene. Juggler of elephants + other awesome curiosities,  follow her on Twitter @doricaminong and spot her around the city with her English Bulldog, #lunasupastar.
Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized

Celebrating Kristi Yamaguchi

By Amber Zeise, Emerging Leader Intern – Special Events, Civic and Social Innovation

Kristi promoAs this year’s Annual Legacy Gala swiftly approaches, the GLIDE family is taking time to acknowledge and appreciate individuals who have dedicated themselves to improving the lives of others. This special evening celebrates the community by dancing, eating, drinking, and rejoicing! It is a chance for new people to learn about GLIDE and lifetime members to commemorate the work lead by Rev. Cecil Williams and Janice Mirikitani for over 50 years to cultivate change and happiness all over San Francisco.

At the Legacy Gala, the GLIDE Community Hero Award
Ceremony honors people who make a difference in communities with special talents, innovative services, and passion. This year, the Janice Mirikitani Award will be given to Kristi Yamaguchi for her unparalleled determination has lead her to win an Olympic Gold Medal and Dancing with the Stars as well as create her own nonprofit the Always Dream Foundation.  Janice has shared, “Kristi is a model for all women, particularly women of color for her deep courage and commitment to excellence – her spirit shines beautifully and boldly.” Rev. Williams added, “She is a beloved champion inspiring young Americans to dream big no matter what the odds.”

Kristi Yamaguchi became a world famous figure skater after receiving the 1992 Olympic Gold Metal in Women’s Singles. She continued her legacy of hard work and achievement on the popular show Dancing with the Stars where she won the title of Celebrity Champion. In 1996 Kristi founded the Always Dream Foundation, which in 2012 announced its dedication to improving children’s lives and empowering aspirations through early childhood literacy programs. Always Dream dedicates resources to provide low income schools with the tools, technology, and support develop reading skills in young children that are often left behind by the public school system. Kristi has also published two children’s books Dream Big, Little Pig and It’s a Big World, Little Pig. Additionally, Kristi just launched her own line of women’s sportswear. She has dedicated her work to empowering young children to achieve despite where they begin. Kristi’s heart and dedication echo the efforts of Janice Mirikitani to give voices and opportunity to all children.

As a woman respected internationally for her talent, drive, and generosity, we gave her the opportunity to share some of her story and values with the GLIDE family.

Scan10318
GLIDE’s Co-Founder Janice Mirikitani, a Sansei (third generation Japanese American) once shared, “Our struggle has insured our survival, love has birthed your possibilities. As a Yonsei (fourth generation Japanese American), can you share the lessons you have learned from your personal struggles which created new possibilities for growth and freedom?

Like Janice and her family, both my parents and their families encountered one of the greatest injustices in United States history, being incarcerated in the internment camps during World War II. As I look back and have learned more about this injustice, I do believe some of my inner-strength, determination to never give up and always keeping a positive outlook comes from this terrible experience my family dealt with.  These qualities were essential to their survival during that difficult time for some 120,000 Japanese Americans.


467345_10150701149053618_1250284590_oWhat inspired you to create the Always Dream Foundation? Can you share with us your views and approach to philanthropy and social engagement? What values do you hope will be carried on to the next generation? What have you witnessed through your charitable work that has most inspired you to continue and expand your commitment to childhood literacy and development?

Simply put, it’s about appreciating your life’s blessing and sharing with those less fortunate.  Early in my skating career, I had an opportunity to experience the work of Make a Wish Foundation and it truly opened my eyes!  I wanted to take that feeling and create an organization that allowed me to make a difference in the lives of children from less fortunate backgrounds.

In 2016, we are celebrating our 20th anniversary. A few years ago, we decided to narrow our focus and change our mission statement to assist in our education crisis. It was an eye-opener to learn that in California over 50% of our third graders are not reading proficiently. Statistics show children are three times less likely to graduate high school, which than spirals into all types of other problems.

So we’re focusing on early childhood literacy these days, we formed a partnership with Raising A Reader and providing underserved schools with 21st century technology, tablets, digital books and an award-winning parent engagement program.

Our belief is, as a small foundation, this is the greatest gift we can provide to have an impact in the lives of children.

GP 2 14-510How do you integrate the athletic spirit of competition, performance and discipline into your entrepreneurial pursuits today? What insights would you share with this audience of young professionals?

Be it my journey to capturing the gold medal, competing in Dancing with the Stars, launching my Always Dream Foundation  or managing Tsuya,  my women’s sportswear company, key is to find your passion, surround yourself with positive people, identify inspiring mentors or coaches so you’re constantly improving and go all in by giving it 100% commitment & dedication.

We have a three day countdown until the 6th Annual GLIDE Legacy Gala! Tickets are available at http://glide.org/legacygalatickets.  See you on Saturday!

AMBERAmber Zeise studies Psychology and Gender and Women’s Studies at UC Berkeley. On campus, she is involved in the Body Positive movement and sexual assault awareness and prevention. At GLIDE, Amber is interning for Dori Caminong in Special Events in order to learn innovative ways to educate the masses about social movements in hopes of incorporating this into her future. 



Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized

Celebrating Chip Conley

by Dori Caminong, Manager - Special Events, Civic and Social Innovation

CHIPWe are getting ready for one of San Francisco’s hottest young professional events,  the 6th Annual GLIDE Legacy Gala! An evening filled with music and dance honoring change agents who are dedicated to improving the lives of poor and underserved communities, San Francisco will come out and celebrate a 51-year legacy of love, leadership and community as exemplified through the legendary work of GLIDE’s Co-Founders Rev. Cecil Williams and Janice Mirikitani.

Three innovative individuals will be honored during the GLIDE Community Hero Award Ceremony, and this year’s winner of the Cecil Williams Legacy Award is…  Chip Conley! “Chip formerly served on the GLIDE Board of Trustees, he provided strategic and experienced wisdom. A person of all seasons, Chip reaches deeply into the heart and soul of the human condition,“ shared Janice Mirikitani. Rev. Cecil Williams added, “His leadership is brilliant and bold, courageous and compassionate, and radically inclusive of all cultures. He walks that walk!“

Chip Conley is the Founder and former CEO of Joie de Vivre Hospitality, he began reinventing hotels in San Francisco at the age of 26. His first — the Tenderloin’s iconic Phoenix Hotel — turned into the 2nd largest boutique hotel brand in America. Author of four books, including PEAK and The New York Times bestseller, EMOTIONAL EQUATIONS, Chip shares his theories on transformation and meaning with audiences around the world. In 2013, he launched Fest300 — connecting his passion for travel, culture, and the world’s best festivals — and he joined Airbnb as Head of Global Hospitality & Strategy where he’s teaching his methods to hundreds of thousands of hosts in nearly 200 countries. Chip received his BA and MBA from Stanford University, and holds an honorary doctorate in psychology from Saybrook University. A former longtime board member at GLIDE, he currently serves on the boards of Youth Speaks, Esalen Institute and the Burning Man Project.

One of today’s most influential entrepreneurs in the business of hospitality, disruption, emotional intelligence and culture, we invited Chip to share his GLIDE story and answer our #TopFive burning questions.

Tday10274How did you first hear about GLIDE? What is your “coming to GLIDE” story? How would you describe your relationship to GLIDE and how has it changed over the years?

At age 26, I bought a bankrupt, pay-by- the-hour motel at Larkin and Eddy Street. The Caravan Lodge was notorious for being full at lunchtime even though it had no restaurant. My dream was to develop a “crossroads for the creative” in the rough and tumble Tenderloin and we named it The Phoenix, since this mythological bird represented the “rising from the ashes” I was hoping to create plus it’s, incidentally, the official city bird of San Francisco. Soon after moving into the neighborhood, I heard about GLIDE as a crossroads for community representing all of San Francisco. My first experience was sneaking in about 9:10 am one Sunday morning and sitting in the last row of the balcony in spring 1987. I was in a state of awe based upon the “love bubble” I found there and over the next year, I moved from the back to the front of the balcony and then to the floor. Then, I started bringing employees and friends there, volunteering, and ultimately joining the Board. One of the proudest days of my life was giving two sermons at GLIDE in 2012. GLIDE has inspired me to find my internal phoenix, the place I go inside myself to resurrect my spirit when I’ve hit a rough patch.

Cecil_002Cecil has said, “I live my life like jazz music.  As long as I’ve got my melody, I can improvise, extemporize, be spontaneous and intuitive.   I may have a theme, but I can change and go in any direction, and have the freedom to experience every person and situation as they are and not as I want them to be.   There is no one way to live your life as long as you are authentic.” What does living an authentic life mean to you?

Oscar Wilde once wrote, “Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.” Wise advice and Cecil has been quite the role model. Authenticty = Self-Awareness x Courage. Many of us spent our youth honing our ability to listen to our external antennae but having no tuning fork for listening to what’s inside. We get so obsessed with looking good that we forget what it means to be real. Adult life can be an emotional archaeological dig as we break through the identities we’ve created for ourselves that aren’t simpatico with that improvising jazz musician inside of us. Carl Jung suggested that, at some point in our middle years, “the glowing coals of consciousness buried deep within the personality begin to break into flames” and this is when many of us feel some kind of midlife crisis. That’s when the courage needs to kick-in. Self-awareness without courage means that you know who you are but the rest of the world doesn’t. The Latin root of courage means “heart.” It takes a passionate heart to march to your own drummer, but I wouldn’t have it any other way. Living a fulfilled life is living an authentic life.

Glide12-228Can you share with us your views and approach to philanthropy and social engagement? What values do you hope will be carried on to the next generation?

It’s all about transformation. Over the past fifteen years, I’ve chosen to be a Board member on four non-profits that are changing the world. GLIDE changes lives and makes the Tenderloin a safer, saner place plus it’s a true role model for what a 21st century church can be. Burning Man and the Esalen Institute are about personal transformation leading to societal transformation. Youth Speaks teaches transformation to our disenfranchised youth through spoken word, a subject that is dear to the heart of our Jan M. I’ve given my time and money to organizations that create a ripple effect in the world. And, I’m very encouraged that a new breed of social entrepreneurs are showing young people that they can integrate business principles into social missions.

G15SunSts-275You introduce many audiences and go in great depth into concepts of cultural curiosity and collective effervescence.  You have shared, “Change doesn’t just start with an idea, it starts with curiosity,” how do you inspire audiences to go beyond their daily individual experiences to open themselves up in a meaningful way to the unknown and unfamiliar?

I went to Snoop Dogg’s high school, Long Beach Poly (although I’m a few years older), and they called me “curious white boy.” I’m so fortunate to have had that upbringing as it taught me how life-affirming curiosity can be. Curiosity is the fertilizer of the mind and soul and it’s the key to creativity. In the context of my life, I started the website Fest300 to introduce people to the 300 best festivals in the world because the more digital we get, the more ritual we need. Whether it’s going to a whirling dervish festival of Sufi Muslims in Konya, Turkey or the Brooklyn Hip-Hop festival, I’ve found that cultural curiosity turns “the other” into my mentor or friend. Unfortunately, during midlife, many of us don’t have time for curiosity. But, please make time. Curiosity has proven to be correlated with resilience and happiness, both personally and societally.


Gtday14-237Our core values emerge from GLIDE as a spiritual movement. They are rooted in empowerment, recovery and personal transformation. Our values inspire and guide our behaviors, they are the ground we stand on.  Below, please find our core values, is there one particular core value which strongly resonates with you personally and why?

I guess it’s not surprising that a guy who called his company Joie de Vivre (joy of life) would resonate with GLIDE’s value of Celebration. The fact that the Sunday services are called “Celebrations” says it all. We spend our lives in the cocoon of our egos doing everything we can to separate ourselves and we end up feeling isolated in the process. GLIDE creates a collective effervescence that melts that separation and a communal joy emerges in its place. The next thing you know, you’re dancing in the aisles, hugging your neighbors, and realizing that we spend way too much of our lives in a non-celebrating culture or in an unhealthy celebrating culture that numbs us with alcohol and narcotics, the Super Bowl and Miss America. “We sing. We dance. We laugh together. We celebrate life.” Sign me up for that!

We have a four day countdown until the 6th Annual GLIDE Legacy Gala! Tickets are available at http://glide.org/legacygalatickets.  See you on Saturday!

11836898_10153458785497856_3461542956952389636_nSince 2005, Dori has been a young leader at GLIDE, one of San Francisco’s premier human services agencies for the poor and most vulnerable communities. She currently serves as Manager – Special Events, Civic and Social Innovation and also known as GLIDE’s Chief Fun Officer (self-appointed). With a strong commitment to diversity and radical inclusion, she is passionate about the intersections of community, technology and culture working closely with various stakeholders to curate meaningful conversations and engagement opportunities to create bridges of hope and collaboration within the Bay Area’s digital eco-system. She was recently appointed to the neighborhood seat of the San Francisco Entertainment Commission by the Board of Supervisors and took office on March 3, 2015. A native San Franciscan, she resides in the Excelsior District. She has been called ubiquitous for her passionate support of San Francisco’s music, arts, culture, community and nightlife scene. Juggler of elephants + other awesome curiosities,  follow her on Twitter @doricaminong and spot her around the city with her English Bulldog, #lunasupastar.
Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized

GLIDE LEGACY EVENT – 08/22/15

V2_Legacy14

Mary Wyatt graduated from Santa Clara University with a BA in Marketing. She started her career in advertising but switched to corporate philanthropy and is currently a Global Program Manager at Gap Foundation in San Francisco. This is her first year on the GLIDE Legacy Committee. 

GLIDE: This is your first time attending the GLIDE Legacy Gala. What are you most excited about?

Mary: I love when my worlds collide. Even better when it’s at an event that’s celebrating an organization I care for and am so proud to be a part of. Having all of my friends, and coworkers in one place, celebrating GLIDE’s legacy is really special, not to mention really fun! I also can’t wait to hear the GLIDE Ensemble; they always give me goosebumps.

GLIDE: What has planning the event been like? Can you give us a behind-the-scenes look?

Mary: I joined the Legacy Committee in March, and the planning was already well under way. To host a successful event, we needed sponsors, food and beverage partners, photographers – the works. Given that we’re a small group, it’s definitely been a divide and conquer approach. I can’t believe how much we’ve been able to accomplish. Even before I joined the committee I had heard the Legacy Gala was one of the best evenings of the year, and I can already see why.

GLIDE: The event is on Saturday, August 22, which isn’t too far away. What’s left to do?

Mary: Make sure all of my friends and network buy tickets before they sell out! Really, they will sell out so if you haven’t already, but your ticket here.

Read more ›

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized

Straight Outta Patience

P1220234
by Rev. Theon Johnson III, Associate Pastor

On Tuesday, August 11, I joined members of the GLIDE family for an advanced screening of Straight Outta Compton hosted by Ben and Felicia Horowitz and the team at Andreessen Horowitz.Following the screening, there was a special Q&A moderated by Ben with Director F. Gary Gray, Actors’ Corey Hawkins, Jason Mitchell, O’Shea Jackson, Jr. and Executive Producer Ice Cube.

P1220260

The film follows the journey of five young men who use the power of music to paint a powerful (yet painfully relevant) portrait of life in one of the most overlooked, underserved communities in America. These young black men stood up to the authorities who sought to use intimidation as a force to silence their voices.

Hailed as street poets by some and revolutionaries by others, the truth uncovered through their lyrics created a melody of resistance which sparked the conscience of so many with their backs against the walls of failed public policies and community networks. Watching these young black men get slammed to the ground, harassed, and searched for no reason by police is an all too familiar image. I sensed deep frustration within the theater as fellow movie goers viewed reenactments of events which continue to plague present day state of affairs in America. I (too) sighed as I watched these scenes.

Then, I saw black women devalued by black men.
Then, I saw a black man board a school bus filled with black and brown children to give a “motivational speech” which involved threatening them with a gun.

Even as citizens are enraged over an escalation of state sponsored violence against black and brown people (we should be enraged), I hope this film assaults our sensibilities by inviting us to consider the prevalence of violence against women (especially black women) and children.

TJ3Straight Outta Answers

Do Black Lives Matter only when they are killed by police violence?
Do Black Lives Matter only when white people perpetuate systemic injustices?
Do Black Lives Matter when black women earn less than any group of our citizenry for work?
Do Black Lives Matter when children step into un-underfunded schools?
Do Black Lives Matter when black lives threaten black lives?
When do Black Lives really Matter?

For the record, I believe this film provides a timely and relevant snapshot into one of the “Two Americas” about which the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. spoke.

Straight Outta Compton offers important vantage points into the lives of some of our most marginalized brothers and sisters. The above reflections are neither intended to discourage anyone from seeing the film nor criticize the realities which the film highlights. As a matter of fact, you should check the film out with GLIDE Folks next Sunday!

Watch Straight Outta Compton with the GLIDE Racial Justice Team

If you want to see this film with GLIDE Folks, join the GLIDE Racial Justice Team next Sunday, August, 16 after the 11 AM Celebration to watch Straight Outta Compton. Meet in the Sanctuary to walk towards the Century San Francisco Centre Theater (Westfield Mall) followed by conversation.

Black lives have always mattered. To be properly understood, this claim must be rooted in an affirmation that all people are of sacred worth. Black Lives Matter must be heard/understood with an implicit “too” at the end of the statement (Black Lives Matter, Too.) and not an implicit “only” at the beginning (Only, Black Lives Matter).

Black lives matter.
LGBTQ+ lives matter.
Women matter.
Children matter.
The hungry matter.
The homeless matter.
The addicted matter.
The forgotten and forsaken matter.

We. All. Matter.

What can you do to ensure that lives matter (even when it’s not the trendiest subject on social media)? How can we (GLIDE) do our part to create a culture which really celebrates life? Too many lives are being lost. There’s too much at stake for our community to sit back and do nothing. We must join the masses who are crying out for justice. We must advocate for our communities. Friends, love compels us to organize and mobilize!

Straight Outta Words- For Now

I’m straight outta patience for injustice and oppression. But, I’m not outta hope. Together, we can make a meaningful difference. Let’s make it happen.

See you on Sunday,

TJ3

TJ3_PHOTOThe Rev. Theon Johnson III is an Associate Pastor at GLIDE Memorial United Methodist Church in San Francisco, CA.  He came to Glide from Mississippi where he served as the United Methodist Campus Minister at Jackson State University.  Theon believes that love is a revolutionary force which empowers people to transform the world. With a background in Philosophy, Religion and Education from Millsaps College, Theon studied Theology and Ethics at Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington DC.  While in Washington, he served as an Advocacy Associate with the General Board of Church and Society on Capitol Hill. Currently, Theon is a doctoral student in Educational Leadership at Jackson State University.
Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized

An Emerging Leader: Jocelyn Hsu, GLIDE Intern

150716 Jocelyn Hsu Glide 2

Jocelyn Hsu, pursuing her BA in Public Health at UC Berkeley, projected Class of 2017.

GLIDE’s Emerging Leaders Internship program is unlike any other. It’s hard to explain to people, and even after you explain, they don’t quite get it. It’s an experience of a lifetime. It’s transformative. It’s eye-opening. It’s messy. It’s honest. It’s GLIDE.

After four weeks here, I’ve realized a lot about myself, my peers, and the program. As I continue my internship, I’m sure I’ll learn even more. But for now, here are three things I’ve discovered about GLIDE during my time here.

  1. GLIDE is an organized chaos.

There are so many components to GLIDE from the Meals to HIV/Hep C Prevention to Recovery Circle to Celebration to Fund Development that it’s natural for the organization to be a little chaotic. But, as a person who likes structure, it took some adjusting to. Sometimes it’s hard to keep track of who’s doing what because there’s a lot going on, but at the end of the day, everything works out beautifully.

  1. GLIDE has a rich history.

GLIDE Memorial Church was erected in 1930 by Lizzie Glide, at the same time as the GLIDE Foundation was established. The church is dedicated to Lizzie’s husband and was built to fulfill her vision of a church in the heart of San Francisco. In addition to creating a religious space, Lizzie wanted to help women, so she built a boarding house, The Mary Elizabeth Inn, and dormitories for UC Berkeley and Asbury College. More than 50 years ago, Janice Mirikitani and Cecil Williams, GLIDE’s co-founders, expanded GLIDE’s charter to serve the local community in an all-inclusive fashion.

  1. GLIDE is the people.

The story of GLIDE is found in the story of its employees and clients. Oftentimes, employees and clients are one in the same since many GLIDE staff members started as clients. You can read about GLIDE all you want, but you won’t truly understand the essence of GLIDE until you meet the folks at GLIDE. The people and their stories of recovery, resilience, inclusivity, and love are what make GLIDE such a unique place.

Come to GLIDE one day, whether for a tour, to volunteer, or to attend celebration. It will be an experience unlike any other. You will leave with questions, but they’ll be good ones, questions that help you learn more about yourself and the society in which you live. As someone said to the 2015 Emerging Leaders, “GLIDE will change you, if you let it.”

Posted in Uncategorized
GLIDE Instagram
Azusa Pacific University....... What a great group of Volunteers Our wonderful volunteers TALENT ROVER AWESOME JOB Prep room.... W/ Volunteers Thea,Sadie and Mandy

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 20,573 other followers

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 20,573 other followers

%d bloggers like this: